To Be A Great Leader, Self-Awareness Is Just The Beginning

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Self-awareness is not enough.

Sure, it plays a great role in being a successful leader, but it is just the beginning. Emotional quotient and having strong self-knowledge also contribute a great deal to becoming a great leader. A leader shares his knowledge, rejoices in the success of his people and help them develop their potential.

With self-knowledge, a true leader is sure of himself, and he encourages his own people to be the best they can be, promoting greater camaraderie and fostering better teamwork which produces better results. He is not threatened by the people he is working with. When it comes to his working environment, he thinks about his employees first, himself second.

He is aware of what he can, his weaknesses and how to improve them. Most importantly, he is aware that to succeed in his endeavor; he need not only talent but compassion as well.

Read on below and find out more why self-awareness is not enough and that there is more to it than what we usually expect.

Comments encouraged and always welcome.

Why Being a Self-Aware Leader Is Not Enough

Emotional intelligence means the ability to recognize and differentiate others’ feelings and respond to them appropriately.

The filters

The result is that many of today’s business leaders who have since embraced the idea and importance of EQ have done so in order to better manage those underneath them.

The difference between self-awareness and self-knowledge

What is self-awareness? It’s like driving down the road and suddenly having to swerve dangerously to miss hitting another vehicle.

Self-knowledge creates self-awareness, and it is through a combination of the two that we develop both empathy and compassion for those we lead.

Arrogance or self-knowledge, and how to know the difference

Leaders with great self-knowledge may be misconstrued as “arrogant,” but what they really are is “certain.”

They have no desire to be anyone other than a deeper, more expansive version of themselves. Self-knowledgeable leaders love to acknowledge others.

–by Dov Baron

To read the entire article, please go to Entrepreneur.com.

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